The National Law Forum

The Blog of the The National Law Review

Category Archives: Legal Employment

The 9 Top Habits of Successful Rainmakers, Part 3 of 3

Working with more than 10,000 attorneys over the past dozen years has taught me a lot about what it takes to be a successful rainmaker. Some would argue you’re born with it; however, I believe many of these successful habits can be learned. To read about the first six top habits of successful rainmakers, go here …

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Part 2: The 9 Top Habits of Successful Rainmakers

Successful rainmakers consistently apply certain habits and characteristics to distinguish themselves from competitors and increase the revenues of their law firms. Click here to read Part 1 for the first three top habits of successful rainmakers. Here are the next three: 4.  Mind and Grow Your Referral Network Just like any cash crop, a referral network needs …

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The 9 Top Habits of Successful Rainmakers, Part 1 of 3

Successful rainmakers have certain habits and characteristics in common that drive them to greater levels of success. These habits and characteristics manifest themselves as key behaviors and specific actions, and understanding how to implement these actions on a consistent basis will distinguish you from your competitors and increase your revenues. 1.  Develop a Solid Personal …

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Law School Applicants Drop 50% in Last Decade; Class of 2010 Provides Insights Into Reason for Decline

According to a report just released by the Law School Admission Council, the number of people applying for law school in the Fall of 2015 as of March 13 is less than half of the number of people who applied to an accredited law school for the Fall of 2005 — 41,136 vs. 95,800. Another …

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Traditional Law Firm Professional Development Models Obsolete?

Most firm’s lawyer staffing model is not far removed from what might be called “traditional” or “old fashioned.” That means that they still hire most new lawyers immediately upon their graduation from law school, or judicial clerkships – and assume that when they join, they are not ready to practice law. We lawyers assume our new …

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