Using Technology to improve legal services? Submit to the Chicago Legal Tech Innovator Showcase! Deadline 9-29!

Is your firm combining technology and innovation to serve clients? We want to know about it! The Chicago Legal Tech Innovation Showcase, brought to you by the Chicago Bar Association’s Future of the Profession Committee and Chicago Kent School of Law is October 24th.  Submissions are due by September 29th, 2017.

A panel of distinguished judges will choose five “Best in Show” awards in each of the 2 awards categories: Law Firm/Legal Services and Company/Product/Service. Each award winner will present a 5 minute pitch at the Chicago Kent Auditorium on October 24 and have an opportunity to exhibit during the event. All submissions that meet the criteria will be listed in a Chicago Legal Tech Showcase Guide 2017

 

The Chicago Legal Tech Innovator Showcase will promote the law firms, legal aid orgs, and companies that are using technology to improve legal services in the Chicago area and highlight those whose innovations are exceptional. Whether the end result is better legal knowledge management, more affordable legal services, or improved metrics for decision making and analysis—and regardless of how the services are delivered—we want to hear what you are doing and so does Chicago’s legal community!

 

To learn more and submit go to: http://lpmt.chicagobar.org/chicago-legal-tech-innovator-showcase/

 

Law School Applicants Drop 50% in Last Decade; Class of 2010 Provides Insights Into Reason for Decline

The Rainmaker Institute

According to a report just released by the Law School Admission Council, the number of people applying for law school in the Fall of 2015 as of March 13 is less than half of the number of people who applied to an accredited law school for the Fall of 2005 — 41,136 vs. 95,800.

Another study just out from Ohio State University’s Michael E. Moritz College of Law professor Deborah Jones Merritt, who examined the job prospects for new lawyers admitted to the Ohio bar in 2010, reflects the stark realities facing recent law school grads:

  • Overall unemployment rate is 6.3%

  • 40% work for law firms

  • 20% currently work in jobs that require no law degree

  • Percentage of solo practitioners is up significantly from graduates a decade ago

This chart from Merritt’s report details the employment status for the Class of 2010 nine months and 55 months post-graduation:

law

Merritt found that many law school graduates might have difficulty finding legal work because of geographical constraints. She reports that two-thirds of the students seek bar admission in the state where they attended law school, and three-fourths stay within the same region as that school.

Gender also has a role to play, according to Merritt:

  • Men are more likely to work in private practice or business

  • Women are more likely to work in government, public interest and academia

  • Men outnumber women in solo and small firm practices

  • Four years after passing the bar, 58% of male lawyers were in private practice vs. 45% of female lawyers

This data may be welcome news to current practitioners who see the glut of graduates taking a toll on market rates for legal services and who struggle daily with increased competition. What’s your take?

The Power of Professional Presence

KLA Marketing Logo

Transitioning from school – – college, law school, grad school, etc. can be a shocking and confusing time for a young professional.

Until now, you may have gotten up, thrown on a pair of jeans and a t-shirt and been good to go.  Transitioning into the professional world and the manner in which you present yourself every day can either strengthen your reputation or detract from it. And, in some extreme cases, ruin it.

Understanding that it may seem frivolous to be so picky on how you dress and how you present yourself, let me assure you, it is not. It matters, every day. The manner in which you “show up” speaks volumes not only about how you feel about yourself, but the respect with which you regard those around you and your position.

If you have not heard this before, and I hope you have, below is a list of “best practices” to use as a reminder for those items to be attentive to any day you may interact in a professional setting:

For Women:

DO

  • Make up. Apply at least a little foundation as it provides a smooth finish on your skin. Just a smidge of blush, a whisper of lip gloss (not the super shiny kind that blinds us), a bit of mascara and brow pencil to frame your face, and you’re good.  I understand some women have no interest, patience, or time for make-up but it matters in the overall professional presence. Not to go overboard on too much color in the office, but rather to enhance your natural beauty.

Be mindful of:

  • Skirt and dress length. To the knee is appropriate in a workplace so as not to create any awkward situations should you bend or stoop down.
  • Blouse and top necklines. Though you may be proud of your well-endowed chest, the office is not the place to show it off. Believe me, the fellas won’t mind but “the” fella who is in charge of your professional progression, will notice that you appear a little “loose”…not in a good way.
  • Shoes– yep, women love shoes, but the stilettos and ankle breakers are not for the office. Leave them for the Saturday night clubs. Invest in a couple of pair of boring pumps (black, navy and neutral) and you’ll be good.
  • Hair – it is not an accessory. Fix it and let it be. It is distracting to see women lawyers constantly with their hands in their hair, tossing it, curling it, flipping it around. If you are nervous, then doodle. Messing with your hair in the office around others does not speak well of you. Don’t do it.

Putting one’s best foot forward (literally and figuratively) will get you noticed and heard quicker and more positively than showing up on shaky group in connection with your professional image.

I’ve addressed some helpful hints for guys below to take note of for a stronger professional presence.

For Guys

DO

  • Shave before coming to work. Maybe that rugged look is in for young guys, but the workplace is not Abercrombie & Fitch, and you need to be well shaven.
  • Be well groomed – no long fingernails, no super gel hair, etc. It matters and others in roles of authority are noticing how you present yourself in the office.
  • Tuck shirt neatly into pants. The “shirt-tail out” look may be appropriate for many occasions, but definitely not in a professional environment.

Be mindful of:

  • Socks. Match socks to your pants (not to your belt or tie) to provide a continuous monochromatic presentation from your pants to your shoes.
  • Shoes. Keep shoes in good shape. No mis-matched laces on the tie ups, or wearingany type of shoe which may resemble a sneaker, golf shoe, running shoe, etc. Invest in a sturdy pair of lace ups and a pair of “cordovan” (burgundy) loafers, and you’ll be well covered with most suits.
  •  Suits. Be measured for your suits, even if you have only one. Wearing an ill-fitted suit negates the professional image you are trying to portray.
  • White Undershirts.  There is a reason they are called “under” shirts mainly to keep guys warm in the winter months…with one exception. If you wear a white dress shirt, depending upon the fabric weight, it may be advisable to wear a white undershirt under the white dress shirt. Provides a more professional image than being able to see chest hair under the dress shirt or, worse, poking out of the shirt…eeew.

Along the professional journey, there will be plenty of times that “best practices” may elude you of feeling secure in your professional image. Easy to understand as there are rarely any “classes” in how to most effectively present your professional self. One way to allay some of the uncertainties is to look around and observe others more senior to you whom you respect and regard highly. How do they show up? Do they appear polished and refined?

Another option to “find” your professional style/image is by engaging the services of a professional stylist/consultant. Many of the higher end department stores (like Neiman Marcus and Lord & Taylor) offer these services. We also maintain a resources list of highly specialized experts who can also put you on the right path.

Regardless, remember, we have one shot at making the best first impression which may materially impact your professional success. Harness the power of professional image now to get and keep you on the right track.

Of:

The National Law Review is Going Back to the Future. New website coming up soon!

The National Law Review is honoring its roots as one of the country’s first nation-wide legal journals by returning to a more journalistic style.   At the same time, we’re adding enhanced features to help our readers more quickly find the nation’s breaking legal news and analysis.

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Look for changes over the next few weeks.

Launch date soon!

2013 National Law Review Law Student Writing Competition

The National Law Review is pleased to announce their 2013 Law Student Writing Competition

NLR-Writing-Competition-Ad2 (1)

The National Law Review (NLR) consolidates practice-oriented legal analysis from a variety of sources for easy access by lawyers, paralegals, law students, business executives, insurance professionals, accountants, compliance officers, human resource managers, and other professionals who wish to better understand specific legal issues relevant to their work.

The NLR Law Student Writing Competition offers law students the opportunity to submit articles for publication consideration on the NLR Web site.  No entry fee is required. Applicants can submit an unlimited number of entries each month.

  • Winning submissions will be published according to specified dates.
  • Entries will be judged and the top two to four articles chosen will be featured on the NLR homepage for a month.  Up to 5 runner-up entries will also be posted in the NLR searchable database each month.
  • Each winning article will be displayed accompanied by the student’s photo, biography, contact information, law school logo, and any copyright disclosure.
  • All winning articles will remain in the NLR database for two years (subject to earlier removal upon request of the law school).

In addition, the NLR sends links to targeted articles to specific professional groups via e-mail. The NLR also posts links to selected articles on the “Legal Issues” or “Research” sections of various professional organizations’ Web sites. (NLR, at its sole discretion, maydistribute any winning entry in such a manner, but does not make any such guarantees nor does NLR represent that this is part of the prize package.)

Congratulations to our 2013, 2012 and 2011 Law Student Writing Contest Winners

Spring 2013:

Winter 2013:

Fall 2012: 

Spring 2012:

Winter 2012:

Fall 2011:

Why Students Should Submit Articles:

  • Students have the opportunity to publicly display their legal knowledge and skills.
  • The student’s photo, biography, and contact information will be posted with each article, allowing for professional recognition and exposure.
  • Winning articles are published alongside those written by respected attorneys from Am Law 200 and other prominent firms as well as from other respected professional associations.
  • Now more than ever, business development skills are expected from law firm associates earlier in their careers. NLR wants to give law students valuable experience generating consumer-friendly legal content of the sort which is included for publication in law firm client newsletters, law firm blogs, bar association journals and trade association publications.
  • Student postings will remain in the NLR online database for up to two years, easily accessed by potential employers.
  • For an example of  a contest winning student written article from Northwestern University, please click here or please review the winning submissions from Spring 2011.

Content Guidelines and Deadlines

Content Guidelines must be followed by all entrants to qualify. It is recommended that articles address the following monthly topic areas:

October 2013 Suggested Topic:

  1. Immigration Law Reform
  • Submission Deadline:  Monday, October 14, 2013

Articles covering current issues related to other areas of the law may also be submitted. Entries must be submitted via email to lawschools@natlawreview.com by 5:00 pm Central Standard Time on the dates indicated above.

Articles will be judged by NLR staff members on the basis of readability, clarity, organization, and timeliness. Tone should be authoritative, but not overly formal. Ideally, articles should be straightforward and practical, containing useful information of interest to legal and business professionals. Judges reserve the right not to award any prizes if it is determined that no entries merit selection for publication by NLR. All judges’ decisions are final. All submissions are subject to the NLR’s Terms of Use.

Students are not required to transfer copyright ownership of their winning articles to the NLR. However, all articles submitted must be clearly identified with any applicable copyright or other proprietary notices. The NLR will accept articles previously published by another publication, provided the author has the authority to grant the right to publish it on the NLR site. Do not submit any material that infringes upon the intellectual property or privacy rights of any third party, including a third party’s unlicensed copyrighted work.

Manuscript Requirements

  • Format – HTML (preferred) or Microsoft® Word
  • Length Articles should be no more than 5,500 words, including endnotes.
  • Endnotes and citations Any citations should be in endnote form and listed at the end of the article. Unreported cases should include docket number and court. Authors are responsible for the accuracy and proper format of related cites. In general, follow the Bluebook. Limit the number of endnotes to only those most essential. Authors are responsible for accuracy of all quoted material.
  • Author Biography/Law School Information – Please submit the following:
    1. Full name of author (First Middle Last)
    2. Contact information for author, including e-mail address and phone number
    3. Author photo (recommended but optional) in JPEG format with a maximum file size of 1 MB and in RGB color format. Image size must be at least 150 x 200 pixels.
    4. A brief professional biography of the author, running approximately 100 words or 1,200 characters including spaces.
    5. The law school’s logo in JPEG format with a maximum file size of 1 MB and in RGB color format. Image size must be at least 300 pixels high or 300 pixels wide.
    6. The law school mailing address, main phone number, contact e-mail address, school Web site address, and a brief description of the law school, running no more than 125 words or 2,100 characters including spaces.

To enter, an applicant and any co-authors must be enrolled in an accredited law school within the fifty United States. Employees of The National Law Review are not eligible. Entries must include ALL information listed above to be considered and must be submitted to the National Law Review at lawschools@natlawreview.com. 

Any entry which does not meet the requirements and deadlines outlined herein will be disqualified from the competition. Winners will be notified via e-mail and/or telephone call at least one day prior to publication. Winners will be publicly announced on the NLR home page and via other media.  All prizes are contingent on recipient signing an Affidavit of Eligibility, Publicity Release and Liability Waiver. The National Law Review 2011 Law Student Writing Competition is sponsored by The National Law Forum, LLC, d/b/a The National Law Review, 4700 Gilbert, Suite 47 (#230), Western Springs, IL 60558, 708-357-3317. This contest is void where prohibited by law. All entries must be submitted in accordance with The National Law Review Contributor Guidelines per the terms of the contest rules. A list of winners may be obtained by writing to the address listed above. There is no fee to enter this contest.

2013 National Law Review Law Student Writing Competition

The National Law Review is pleased to announce their 2013 Law Student Writing Competition

NLR-Writing-Competition-Ad2 (1)

The National Law Review (NLR) consolidates practice-oriented legal analysis from a variety of sources for easy access by lawyers, paralegals, law students, business executives, insurance professionals, accountants, compliance officers, human resource managers, and other professionals who wish to better understand specific legal issues relevant to their work.

The NLR Law Student Writing Competition offers law students the opportunity to submit articles for publication consideration on the NLR Web site.  No entry fee is required. Applicants can submit an unlimited number of entries each month.

  • Winning submissions will be published according to specified dates.
  • Entries will be judged and the top two to four articles chosen will be featured on the NLR homepage for a month.  Up to 5 runner-up entries will also be posted in the NLR searchable database each month.
  • Each winning article will be displayed accompanied by the student’s photo, biography, contact information, law school logo, and any copyright disclosure.
  • All winning articles will remain in the NLR database for two years (subject to earlier removal upon request of the law school).

In addition, the NLR sends links to targeted articles to specific professional groups via e-mail. The NLR also posts links to selected articles on the “Legal Issues” or “Research” sections of various professional organizations’ Web sites. (NLR, at its sole discretion, maydistribute any winning entry in such a manner, but does not make any such guarantees nor does NLR represent that this is part of the prize package.)

Congratulations to our 2013, 2012 and 2011 Law Student Writing Contest Winners

Spring 2013:

Winter 2013:

Fall 2012: 

Spring 2012:

Winter 2012:

Fall 2011:

Why Students Should Submit Articles:

  • Students have the opportunity to publicly display their legal knowledge and skills.
  • The student’s photo, biography, and contact information will be posted with each article, allowing for professional recognition and exposure.
  • Winning articles are published alongside those written by respected attorneys from Am Law 200 and other prominent firms as well as from other respected professional associations.
  • Now more than ever, business development skills are expected from law firm associates earlier in their careers. NLR wants to give law students valuable experience generating consumer-friendly legal content of the sort which is included for publication in law firm client newsletters, law firm blogs, bar association journals and trade association publications.
  • Student postings will remain in the NLR online database for up to two years, easily accessed by potential employers.
  • For an example of  a contest winning student written article from Northwestern University, please click here or please review the winning submissions from Spring 2011.

Content Guidelines and Deadlines

Content Guidelines must be followed by all entrants to qualify. It is recommended that articles address the following monthly topic areas:

October 2013 Suggested Topic:

  1. Immigration Law Reform
  • Submission Deadline:  Monday, October 14, 2013

Articles covering current issues related to other areas of the law may also be submitted. Entries must be submitted via email to lawschools@natlawreview.com by 5:00 pm Central Standard Time on the dates indicated above.

Articles will be judged by NLR staff members on the basis of readability, clarity, organization, and timeliness. Tone should be authoritative, but not overly formal. Ideally, articles should be straightforward and practical, containing useful information of interest to legal and business professionals. Judges reserve the right not to award any prizes if it is determined that no entries merit selection for publication by NLR. All judges’ decisions are final. All submissions are subject to the NLR’s Terms of Use.

Students are not required to transfer copyright ownership of their winning articles to the NLR. However, all articles submitted must be clearly identified with any applicable copyright or other proprietary notices. The NLR will accept articles previously published by another publication, provided the author has the authority to grant the right to publish it on the NLR site. Do not submit any material that infringes upon the intellectual property or privacy rights of any third party, including a third party’s unlicensed copyrighted work.

Manuscript Requirements

  • Format – HTML (preferred) or Microsoft® Word
  • Length Articles should be no more than 5,500 words, including endnotes.
  • Endnotes and citations Any citations should be in endnote form and listed at the end of the article. Unreported cases should include docket number and court. Authors are responsible for the accuracy and proper format of related cites. In general, follow the Bluebook. Limit the number of endnotes to only those most essential. Authors are responsible for accuracy of all quoted material.
  • Author Biography/Law School Information – Please submit the following:
    1. Full name of author (First Middle Last)
    2. Contact information for author, including e-mail address and phone number
    3. Author photo (recommended but optional) in JPEG format with a maximum file size of 1 MB and in RGB color format. Image size must be at least 150 x 200 pixels.
    4. A brief professional biography of the author, running approximately 100 words or 1,200 characters including spaces.
    5. The law school’s logo in JPEG format with a maximum file size of 1 MB and in RGB color format. Image size must be at least 300 pixels high or 300 pixels wide.
    6. The law school mailing address, main phone number, contact e-mail address, school Web site address, and a brief description of the law school, running no more than 125 words or 2,100 characters including spaces.

To enter, an applicant and any co-authors must be enrolled in an accredited law school within the fifty United States. Employees of The National Law Review are not eligible. Entries must include ALL information listed above to be considered and must be submitted to the National Law Review at lawschools@natlawreview.com. 

Any entry which does not meet the requirements and deadlines outlined herein will be disqualified from the competition. Winners will be notified via e-mail and/or telephone call at least one day prior to publication. Winners will be publicly announced on the NLR home page and via other media.  All prizes are contingent on recipient signing an Affidavit of Eligibility, Publicity Release and Liability Waiver. The National Law Review 2011 Law Student Writing Competition is sponsored by The National Law Forum, LLC, d/b/a The National Law Review, 4700 Gilbert, Suite 47 (#230), Western Springs, IL 60558, 708-357-3317. This contest is void where prohibited by law. All entries must be submitted in accordance with The National Law Review Contributor Guidelines per the terms of the contest rules. A list of winners may be obtained by writing to the address listed above. There is no fee to enter this contest.

Vault/MCCA Legal Diversity Career Fair – August 2, 2013

The National Law Review is pleased to bring you information about the upcoming Vault/MCCA Legal Diversity Career Fair:

VaultAd-250x250

Attention 2L, 3L and Lateral Candidates:

Join us at the Vault/MCCA Legal Diversity Career Fair!

The Vault/MCCA Legal Diversity Career Fair will provide minority, female, LGBT and candidates with disabilities the opportunity to meet and network with recruiters from law firms and government agencies who are firmly committed to increasing diversity in the legal profession.

When: Friday, August 2, 2013

Where: Capital Hilton, Washington, DC