Category Archives: Intellectual Property

Supreme Court Reinvigorates Effectiveness of Obtaining an Opinion of Counsel to Defend against Potential Enhanced Damages for Willful Infringement in Halo Electronics

On June 13, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court again reversed a decision of the Federal Circuit—the Circuit specially designated to hear all patent appeals—this time, in articulating the test for determining whether to award enhanced damages for willful patent infringement in Halo Electronics, Inc. v. Pulse Electronics, Inc.1  This is the third time in two …

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Sweeping Changes in EU Trademark Law and the Brexit Unknown

By now you have undoubtedly heard that in the Brexit Referendum held on June 23, 2016, the majority vote was in favor of United Kingdom leaving the European Union. Notwithstanding the outcome of the vote, it is presently unclear when, or even if, the UK government will give notification to the EU of its intention to …

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Federal Circuit Clarifies the “Commercial Offer for Sale” Prong of the On-Sale Bar

On July 11, 2016, a unanimous Federal Circuit en banc affirmed that The Medicines Company’s (“TMC”) use of third-party contract manufacturing services did not invalidate U.S. Patent Nos. 7,582,727 and 7,598,343 (the “patents-in-suit”) under the on-sale bar, reverting back to the district court’s original ruling but on modified grounds. The Medicines Company v. Hospira, Inc., …

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Intellectual Property and You: University Edition

It may be July, but school is still in session. Today, I’ll discuss another common but mysterious topic: intellectual property ownership, specifically in the university setting. Universities sponsor research, encourage experimentation, and foster collaboration. The hallowed halls of universities are treasure troves of intellectual property. However, the process can hit a snag when it comes …

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Federal Circuit Requires 180 Day Notice For All Biosimilars, Even After Patent Dance

In Amgen v. Apotex, the Federal Circuit rejected Apotex’s arguments that the 180-day pre-marketing notice requirement does not apply to biosimilar applicants who participated in the “patent dance” process of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (“BPCIA”), expanding on its decision in Amgen v. Sandoz that 42 USC § 262(l)(8)(A) is a mandatory, stand-alone requirement. …

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Senate Judiciary Introduces CREATES Act To Expedite Access To Affordable Drugs

Following months of public outcry and Congressional probes into significant drug price increases, the Senate Judiciary Committee introduced legislation targeting “behavior that blocks competition and delays the creation of affordable generic drugs” and biosimilar products. The bill, entitled the Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2016, S. 3056, would punish the strategic …

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The New Federalization of Trade Secret Law – What You Should Know About the DTSA

On May 11, 2016, the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 (DTSA) officially became law, creating for the first time a federal private civil cause of action for misappropriation of trade secrets. The DTSA is actually an amendment to the Economic Espionage Act, which was passed 20 years ago and provides for criminal prosecution of …

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Defend Trade Secrets Act: Got Trade Secrets? Protect Them With Federally-Issued Gun

Trade secrets are protected, right? They cannot be stolen or misappropriated, right? You are probably shaking your head at this. Right, right. But if they are, what can you really do about it? Have the grubby thief thrown in jail? Sure, but that’s not going to restore your loss—get you back the money you are now …

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Supreme Court Defers Certiorari Decision In Amgen Sandoz

On June 20, 2016, instead of deciding whether to grant certiorari in the biosimilar patent dance dispute between Amgen and Sandoz, the Supreme Court invited the Solicitor General “to file a brief in this case expressing the views of the United States.” While this will delay any Supreme Court review of the Federal Circuit’s first decision interpreting the …

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Band Led Zeppelin Says Song Chords Too Common to Copyright

Can you say “Stairway to Heavy Royalties?” You may have imagined the old Led heads, Robert Page and Jimmy Plant, sitting in a grungy garage somewhere back in the seventies striking those iconic four chords for the first time and truly crafting the song “Stairway to Heaven” from whence there was none. Now you may …

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